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Kenya’s children: yes, it takes a village to raise them September 24, 2010

Filed under: the journey — Admin @ 1:01 am
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If you never knew it, now you know- African children are beautiful.

Okay, before you raise your eyebrows, I want to clarify that I am not demeaning any other groups of people with this comment. I am simply making a note that despite poverty, hardship, and racial discrimination, African children still captivate and glow with innocent beauty. Kenyan’s children are no exception. Everywhere I went throughout the country, I looked out for children and they were not hard to miss. I saw them in kitchens, playing on the streets, washing clothes, crying, laughing, etc.

This collage shows kids that I met in Nairobi and Nyeri. Top, Left to right: 1) These two girls live in Kibera, the largest slum in Africa. It’s in the southwest corner of Nairobi’s outskirts. The shy girls watched as my K24 colleagues and I interviewed residents and took photos. 2) Here is another kid I saw in Kibera. Looking over his shoulder, he stood next to a river of filth. 3) These hyper kids went ballistic when they saw me and the K24 camera-guy shooting on the school campus. I was at a primary school in Dagoretti, Nairobi doing a story on dyslexia. Bottom row, left to right: 1) This dyslexic boy is another student from the primary school in Dagoretti. I thought he was so adorable and he spoke well during the interview. 2) This is a young girl in Nyeri who lives at a youth center because her family cannot afford to raise her. When I asked about her impoverished childhood, she couldn’t answer and began to cry. 3) More kids from Kibera

Top row, left to right: 1) These kids were watching as customers wandered through the Maasai Market at the Kenya International Conference Center in Nairobi’s Central Business District 2) I played peak-a-boo with the boy with the large head and enormous eyes. Whenever I would look at him, he’d laugh hysterically and hide. I met him in Central Province. He’s about 3 years old. 3) adolescent girls in Nyeri  Bottom row, left to right: 1) These adorable girls live in Central Province. I thought it was so cute how the girl in the plaid dress was hiding behind the taller girl when I stood before them 2) Most of these boys are orphans and they live at a youth center in Nyeri 3) This is Phyllis’ nephew. He’s a cute kid with lovely cocoa-skin and huge, almond-shaped eyes

Africa’s children have a lot on their shoulders. They are the future of this continent and as they grow, they will surely face more hardship. Many of them live in struggling communities and statistics say that most of them will not live past the age of 48. But they have already defied the odds by being born, surviving infancy and sleeping under a roof.

They will probably be told that they are not worthy of success, and they will surely see demeaning images of people with brown skin being maltreated, enduring hellish experiences. But these children have the ability to rise and as Africans tend to do, they will survive and let’s pray that they thrive.